Wake Forest Historical Museum

Intern Reflections: “The rich legacy of Black education across generations.”

As an intern with the Wake Forest Historical Museum, I’ve been pouring through census data, finding traces of children as young as six, adult musicians, religious leaders, and school teachers who contributed to a project of Black learning prior to and in the aftermath of emancipation in Wake Forest.

May 27, 2021

Rain Saves Lives at Olive Branch Baptist Church

It was February 10, 1946 when heavy rain struck–bringing with it a miracle that could be called fate, luck, or Providence. As it was a Sunday morning, the children of … Continue reading

February 23, 2017 · Leave a comment

From Slavery to Freedom in Wake Forest

When Calvin Jones arrived at his newly purchased farm in 1821–in the part of the county he later named “Wake Forest”–he brought more than his family. He also brought a number of … Continue reading

February 2, 2016 · 12 Comments

Olive Branch Baptist Church

During the Civil War, slaves worshipping at Wake Forest Baptist Church broke away to create their own congregation. The Baptist Church leaders offered help, funding and guidance, demonstrating the Christian … Continue reading

August 20, 2013 · 1 Comment

“Doctor” Tom Jeffries

Born a slave in Virginia, Tom Jeffries came to Wake Forest College in 1884 and continued working there for 43-years. Students and professors often sought his advice and wisdom, and … Continue reading

July 24, 2013 · Leave a comment