Wake Forest Historical Museum

LOCATION: 414 N. Main Street Wake Forest, NC 27587 CONTACT: 919-556-2911

Restoring the Old Well

Well Repair 1

Even the most charming landmarks can deteriorate over time. And after more than a century as one of Wake Forest’s most symbolic structures, the historic Old Well needed a bit of a facelift. The outdated lead paint was chipped and peeling, and sections of wood were beginning to decay.

Enter Wake Forest University and its Department of Facility Services which, after several days spent evaluating the condition of the structure, sent two carpenters and six painters to work three weeks restoring the Old Well. The team also attended to similar damage affecting the exterior of the Calvin Jones House– removing rotted wood, repairing 30 shutters, and replacing over 300 board feet of siding.

Now returned to its former glory, the Old Well will look beautiful for many years to come. We’re very thankful for this assistance, and commend Wake Forest University for its constant and generous support.

Comments are welcome...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Hours & Info

Tues-Fri: 9am-noon & 1:30-4:30pm
Sun: 2pm-5pm

Closed: Saturday and Monday

Call us at 919.556.2911

Free Admission

Follow us on Instagram!

A lovely bouquet left by the Wake Forest Garden Club. WFHS tassel. We’re going through the collection and it’s fun! Downtown Zebulon, NC at night. Simply stunning. Want to know what today’s weather was like exactly 90-years ago? This 1928 Farm Journal was kept at Oakforest in Forestville and that day was “Fair and cold. Henry, Richard and I went to Raleigh today. Philo and Junior sawed and hauled firewood and then hauled logs to the same mill.” Many thanks to Barbara Massenburg for giving us a look at this very cool artifact!